angle sparin

Learn how to manage an Ankle Sprain

Learn How to Manage an Ankle Sprain

Have you ever missed a step while climbing down? Or twisted your foot on an uneven path? If yes, then read on to know more…

An ankle sprain occurs when the strong ligaments that support the ankle stretch beyond their limits and tear. Ankle sprains are common injuries that occur among people of all ages. They range from mild to severe, depending upon how much damage there is to the ligaments.

Most sprains are minor injuries that heal with home treatments like rest and applying ice. However, if your ankle is very swollen and painful to walk on — or if you are having trouble putting weight on your ankle at all, be sure to see your doctor.

Without proper treatment and rehabilitation, a more severe sprain can weaken your ankle—making it more likely that you will injure it again. Repeated ankle sprains can lead to long-term problems, including chronic ankle pain, arthritis, and ongoing instability.

Causes of ankle sprain

Your foot can twist unexpectedly during many different activities, such as:

  • Walking or exercising on an uneven surface
  • Falling down
  • Participating in sports that require cutting actions or rolling and twisting of the foot—such as trail running, basketball, tennis, football, and soccer
  • During sports activities, someone else may step on your foot while you are running, causing your foot to twist or roll to the side.

Symptoms

A sprained ankle is painful. Other symptoms may include:

  • Swelling and bruising. It may be so swollen that you can press on the area with your finger and leave an indent.
  • Pain. Your nerves are more sensitive after a sprain. The joint hurts and may throb. It’s often worse when you press on it, move your foot in certain ways, walk, or stand.
  • Instability of the ankle—this may occur when there has been complete tearing of the ligament or a complete dislocation of the ankle joint.
  • Redness and warmth. A sprain causes more blood to flow to the area.
  • The joint can feel weak when the ligament is totally torn.
  • Trouble walking. A sprain may limit how much you can move your ankle.

 

 

Bruising and swelling are common signs of a sprained ankle.

Physical Examination

Your doctor will diagnose your ankle sprain by performing a careful examination of your foot and ankle. This physical exam may be painful.

  • Your doctor will gently press around the ankle to determine which ligaments are injured.
  • Range of motion.He or she may also move your ankle in different directions; however, a stiff, swollen ankle usually will not move much.

If there is no broken bone, your doctor may be able to tell the severity of your ankle sprain based upon the amount of swelling, pain, and bruising.

To diagnose a sprain, your doctor will gently palpate around the outside of the ankle in the area of the pain.

Imaging Tests

X-rays. X-rays provide images of dense structures, such as bone. Your doctor may order x-rays to rule out a broken bone in your ankle or foot. A broken bone can cause similar symptoms of pain and swelling.

Stress x-rays. In addition to plain x-rays, your doctor may also order stress x-rays. These scans are taken while the ankle is being pushed in different directions. Stress x-rays help to show whether the ankle is moving abnormally because of injured ligaments.

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan. Your doctor may order an MRI if he or she suspects a very severe injury to the ligaments, damage to the cartilage or bone of the joint surface, a small bone chip, or another problem. The MRI may not be ordered until after the period of swelling and bruising resolves.

Ultrasound. This imaging scan allows your doctor to observe the ligament directly while he or she moves your ankle. This helps your doctor to determine how much stability the ligament provides.

Treatment

Almost all ankle sprains can be treated without surgery. Even a complete ligament tear can heal without surgical repair if it is immobilized appropriately.

A three-phase program guides treatment for all ankle sprains—from mild to severe:

  • Phase 1includes resting, protecting the ankle and reducing the swelling.
  • Phase 2includes restoring range of motion, strength and flexibility.
  • Phase 3includes maintenance exercises and the gradual return to activities that do not require turning or twisting the ankle. This will be followed later by being able to do activities that require sharp, sudden turns (cutting activities)—such as tennis, basketball, or football.

This three-phase treatment program may take just 2 weeks to complete for minor sprains, or up to 6 to 12 weeks for more severe injuries.

Medication. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen and naproxen can help control pain and swelling. Because they improve function by both reducing swelling and controlling pain, they are a better option for mild sprains than narcotic pain medicines.

Nonsurgical Treatment

Some sprains will require treatment in addition to the RICE protocol and medications.

Crutches. In most cases, swelling and pain will last from 2 to 3 days. Walking may be difficult during this time and your doctor may recommend that you use crutches as needed.

Immobilization. During the early phase of healing, it is important to support your ankle and protect it from sudden movements. For a Grade 2 sprain, a removable plastic device such as a cast-boot or air stirrup-type brace can provide support. Grade 3 sprains may require a short leg cast or cast-brace for 2 to 3 weeks.

An air stirrup-type ankle brace.

Your doctor may encourage you to put some weight on your ankle while it is protected. This can help with healing.

Physical therapy. Rehabilitation exercises are used to prevent stiffness, increase ankle strength, and prevent chronic ankle problems.

  • Early motion.To prevent stiffness, your doctor or physical therapist will provide you with exercises that involve range-of-motion or controlled movements of your ankle without resistance.
  • Strengthening exercises.Once you can bear weight without increased pain or swelling, exercises to strengthen the muscles and tendons in the front and back of your leg and foot will be added to your treatment plan. Water exercises may be used if land-based strengthening exercises, such as toe-raising, are too painful. Exercises with resistance are added as tolerated.
  • Endurance and agility exercises.Once you are pain-free, other exercises may be added, such as agility drills. Running in progressively smaller figures-of-8 is excellent for agility and calf and ankle strength. The goal is to increase strength and range of motion as balance improves over time.

 

Home Treatments

For milder sprains, your doctor may recommend simple home treatment.

The RICE protocol. Follow the RICE protocol as soon as possible after your injury:

  • Restyour ankle by not walking on it.
  • Iceshould be immediately applied to keep the swelling down. It can be used for 20 to 30 minutes, three or four times daily. Do not apply ice directly to your skin.
  • Compressiondressings, bandages or ace-wraps will immobilize and support your injured ankle.
  • Elevateyour ankle above the level of your heart as often as possible during the first 48 hours.

 

Prevention

The best way to prevent ankle sprains is to maintain good muscle strength, balance, and flexibility. The following precautions will help prevent sprains:

  • Warm up thoroughly before exercise and physical activity
  • Pay careful attention when walking, running, or working on an uneven surface
  • Wear shoes that are made for your activity
  • Slow down or stop activities when you feel pain or fatigue

 

 

 

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Near Steel Factory Bus Stop,
Dodda Banaswadi Main Road,
Bengaluru-560043 Phone: 080-4370 1281 Mobile: 9591618833

Website: www.total-orthocare.com

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